January 19, 2004

The New York Transit Museum

POST #    708


An old subway, circa 1907, the reason commuters are called "straphangers".


The bell that rings when a stop is requested on the same 1907 train.


Another old train, note the fans on the ceilings of the car. Circa 1916.


Seating on the old-time subway, circa 1928. They were made of a woven material.


Subway car circa 1949.


Metal "straps" on a subway car circa 1955.


"Deposit Coins Here"


"Every woman will eventually vote - for Gold Dust."


Signage for the 1964 World's Fair.

Yesterday, Rachelle and I took a trip to the New York Transit Museum. It was my first time going there, despite my parents living across the street from it since the late 90s. I'm thrilled that I finally made the effort to check it out and for $5, it was a great time.

The transit museum was no ordinary museum - there were interactive exhibits, making for a fun time for kids of all ages! This, of course, was in addition to a few items that required you to read, but since the museum is very child friendly, interaction is a must.

The New York Transit Museum is actually located in an old 1936 IND subway station. There are even warnings that the 3rd rail of the subway station is electrified.

The New York City Subway system is one of the largest in the world and turns 100 on October 27th of this year. Before the 1940s, when the city took over the subway system, three different companies all ran trains in New York - Interborough Rapid Transit, Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit, and the Independent Subway. The NYC system is the 3rd oldest in the world (London, 1863 and Paris, 1900 are older), the second longest (after London), and has the most stations of any system in the world.

- Fun at The Transit Museum
- Rachelle's entry on the transit museum

Additional Information:
- NYCSubway.org - a great resource on the New York City Subway system.

Posted by tien mao in NYC, Photos at 7:25 AM

 

 

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